Ziegenproblem

Ziegenproblem Inhaltsverzeichnis

Das Ziegenproblem, Drei-Türen-Problem, Monty-Hall-Problem oder Monty-Hall-​Dilemma ist eine Aufgabe zur Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie. Es geht dabei um die. Das Ziegenproblem, Drei-Türen-Problem, Monty-Hall-Problem oder Monty-Hall-Dilemma ist eine Aufgabe zur Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie. Das Ziegenproblem ist auch als "Monty Hall Problem" bekannt. Monty Hall moderierte bereits in den 60er Jahren die Show "Let's make a deal". Ziegenproblem-Simulator. Klicken Sie auf eines der Tore, um das Ziegenproblem spielerisch zu entdecken. Weitere Information unten auf dieser Seite. Am so genannten Ziegenproblem bissen sich sogar Nobelpreisträger die Zähne aus. Deutsche Forscher haben endlich einen Weg gefunden.

Ziegenproblem

Am so genannten Ziegenproblem bissen sich sogar Nobelpreisträger die Zähne aus. Deutsche Forscher haben endlich einen Weg gefunden. Das Ziegenproblem ist eine Aufgabe aus dem Feld der Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie, die auf einen Leserbrief im American Statistician von Steve Selvin. Das Ziegenproblem, Drei-Türen-Problem, Monty-Hall-Problem oder Monty-Hall-Dilemma ist eine Aufgabe zur Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie.

Ziegenproblem Video

Was verbirgt sich hinter dem Ziegenproblem

The fact that these are different can be shown by varying the problem so that these two probabilities have different numeric values.

For example, assume the contestant knows that Monty does not pick the second door randomly among all legal alternatives but instead, when given an opportunity to pick between two losing doors, Monty will open the one on the right.

In this situation, the following two questions have different answers:. For this variation, the two questions yield different answers.

Morgan et al. Four university professors published an article Morgan et al. In an invited comment Seymann and in subsequent letters to the editor, vos Savant c ; Rao ; Bell, ; Hogbin and Nijdam, Morgan et al.

In particular, vos Savant defended herself vigorously. Later in their response to Hogbin and Nijdam , they did agree that it was natural to suppose that the host chooses a door to open completely at random, when he does have a choice, and hence that the conditional probability of winning by switching i.

This equality was already emphasized by Bell , who suggested that Morgan et al. There is disagreement in the literature regarding whether vos Savant's formulation of the problem, as presented in Parade magazine, is asking the first or second question, and whether this difference is significant Rosenhouse Behrends concludes that "One must consider the matter with care to see that both analyses are correct"; which is not to say that they are the same.

One analysis for one question, another analysis for the other question. Several critics of the paper by Morgan et al. One discussant William Bell considered it a matter of taste whether or not one explicitly mentions that under the standard conditions , which door is opened by the host is independent of whether or not one should want to switch.

Among the simple solutions, the "combined doors solution" comes closest to a conditional solution, as we saw in the discussion of approaches using the concept of odds and Bayes theorem.

It is based on the deeply rooted intuition that revealing information that is already known does not affect probabilities.

But, knowing that the host can open one of the two unchosen doors to show a goat does not mean that opening a specific door would not affect the probability that the car is behind the initially chosen door.

The point is, though we know in advance that the host will open a door and reveal a goat, we do not know which door he will open.

If the host chooses uniformly at random between doors hiding a goat as is the case in the standard interpretation , this probability indeed remains unchanged, but if the host can choose non-randomly between such doors, then the specific door that the host opens reveals additional information.

The host can always open a door revealing a goat and in the standard interpretation of the problem the probability that the car is behind the initially chosen door does not change, but it is not because of the former that the latter is true.

Solutions based on the assertion that the host's actions cannot affect the probability that the car is behind the initially chosen appear persuasive, but the assertion is simply untrue unless each of the host's two choices are equally likely, if he has a choice Falk , The assertion therefore needs to be justified; without justification being given, the solution is at best incomplete.

The answer can be correct but the reasoning used to justify it is defective. The solutions in this section consider just those cases in which the player picked door 1 and the host opened door 3.

If we assume that the host opens a door at random, when given a choice, then which door the host opens gives us no information at all as to whether or not the car is behind door 1.

Moreover, the host is certainly going to open a different door, so opening a door which door unspecified does not change this.

But, these two probabilities are the same. By definition, the conditional probability of winning by switching given the contestant initially picks door 1 and the host opens door 3 is the probability for the event "car is behind door 2 and host opens door 3" divided by the probability for "host opens door 3".

These probabilities can be determined referring to the conditional probability table below, or to an equivalent decision tree as shown to the right Chun ; Carlton ; Grinstead and Snell — The conditional probability table below shows how cases, in all of which the player initially chooses door 1, would be split up, on average, according to the location of the car and the choice of door to open by the host.

Many probability text books and articles in the field of probability theory derive the conditional probability solution through a formal application of Bayes' theorem ; among them Gill, and Henze, Use of the odds form of Bayes' theorem, often called Bayes' rule, makes such a derivation more transparent Rosenthal, a , Rosenthal, b.

This remains the case after the player has chosen door 1, by independence. According to Bayes' rule , the posterior odds on the location of the car, given that the host opens door 3, are equal to the prior odds multiplied by the Bayes factor or likelihood, which is, by definition, the probability of the new piece of information host opens door 3 under each of the hypotheses considered location of the car.

Given that the host opened door 3, the probability that the car is behind door 3 is zero, and it is twice as likely to be behind door 2 than door 1.

Richard Gill analyzes the likelihood for the host to open door 3 as follows. Given that the car is not behind door 1, it is equally likely that it is behind door 2 or 3.

In words, the information which door is opened by the host door 2 or door 3? Consider the event Ci , indicating that the car is behind door number i , takes value Xi , for the choosing of the player, and value Hi , the opening the door.

Then, if the player initially selects door 1, and the host opens door 3, we prove that the conditional probability of winning by switching is:.

Going back to Nalebuff , the Monty Hall problem is also much studied in the literature on game theory and decision theory , and also some popular solutions correspond to this point of view.

Vos Savant asks for a decision, not a chance. And the chance aspects of how the car is hidden and how an unchosen door is opened are unknown.

From this point of view, one has to remember that the player has two opportunities to make choices: first of all, which door to choose initially; and secondly, whether or not to switch.

Since he does not know how the car is hidden nor how the host makes choices, he may be able to make use of his first choice opportunity, as it were to neutralize the actions of the team running the quiz show, including the host.

Following Gill, a strategy of contestant involves two actions: the initial choice of a door and the decision to switch or to stick which may depend on both the door initially chosen and the door to which the host offers switching.

For instance, one contestant's strategy is "choose door 1, then switch to door 2 when offered, and do not switch to door 3 when offered".

Twelve such deterministic strategies of the contestant exist. Elementary comparison of contestant's strategies shows that, for every strategy A, there is another strategy B "pick a door then switch no matter what happens" that dominates it Gnedin, No matter how the car is hidden and no matter which rule the host uses when he has a choice between two goats, if A wins the car then B also does.

For example, strategy A "pick door 1 then always stick with it" is dominated by the strategy B "pick door 1 then always switch after the host reveals a door": A wins when door 1 conceals the car, while B wins when one of the doors 2 and 3 conceals the car.

Similarly, strategy A "pick door 1 then switch to door 2 if offered , but do not switch to door 3 if offered " is dominated by strategy B "pick door 3 then always switch".

Dominance is a strong reason to seek for a solution among always-switching strategies, under fairly general assumptions on the environment in which the contestant is making decisions.

In particular, if the car is hidden by means of some randomization device — like tossing symmetric or asymmetric three-sided die — the dominance implies that a strategy maximizing the probability of winning the car will be among three always-switching strategies, namely it will be the strategy that initially picks the least likely door then switches no matter which door to switch is offered by the host.

Strategic dominance links the Monty Hall problem to the game theory. In the zero-sum game setting of Gill, , discarding the non-switching strategies reduces the game to the following simple variant: the host or the TV-team decides on the door to hide the car, and the contestant chooses two doors i.

The contestant wins and her opponent loses if the car is behind one of the two doors she chose. A simple way to demonstrate that a switching strategy really does win two out of three times with the standard assumptions is to simulate the game with playing cards Gardner b ; vos Savant , p.

Three cards from an ordinary deck are used to represent the three doors; one 'special' card represents the door with the car and two other cards represent the goat doors.

The simulation can be repeated several times to simulate multiple rounds of the game. The player picks one of the three cards, then, looking at the remaining two cards the 'host' discards a goat card.

If the card remaining in the host's hand is the car card, this is recorded as a switching win; if the host is holding a goat card, the round is recorded as a staying win.

As this experiment is repeated over several rounds, the observed win rate for each strategy is likely to approximate its theoretical win probability, in line with the law of large numbers.

Repeated plays also make it clearer why switching is the better strategy. After the player picks his card, it is already determined whether switching will win the round for the player.

If this is not convincing, the simulation can be done with the entire deck. Gardner b ; Adams In this variant, the car card goes to the host 51 times out of 52, and stays with the host no matter how many non -car cards are discarded.

A common variant of the problem, assumed by several academic authors as the canonical problem, does not make the simplifying assumption that the host must uniformly choose the door to open, but instead that he uses some other strategy.

The confusion as to which formalization is authoritative has led to considerable acrimony, particularly because this variant makes proofs more involved without altering the optimality of the always-switch strategy for the player.

The variants are sometimes presented in succession in textbooks and articles intended to teach the basics of probability theory and game theory.

A considerable number of other generalizations have also been studied. The version of the Monty Hall problem published in Parade in did not specifically state that the host would always open another door, or always offer a choice to switch, or even never open the door revealing the car.

I personally read nearly three thousand letters out of the many additional thousands that arrived and found nearly every one insisting simply that because two options remained or an equivalent error , the chances were even.

Very few raised questions about ambiguity, and the letters actually published in the column were not among those few. The table below shows a variety of other possible host behaviors and the impact on the success of switching.

Determining the player's best strategy within a given set of other rules the host must follow is the type of problem studied in game theory.

For example, if the host is not required to make the offer to switch the player may suspect the host is malicious and makes the offers more often if the player has initially selected the car.

In general, the answer to this sort of question depends on the specific assumptions made about the host's behavior, and might range from "ignore the host completely" to "toss a coin and switch if it comes up heads"; see the last row of the table below.

Both changed the wording of the Parade version to emphasize that point when they restated the problem. They consider a scenario where the host chooses between revealing two goats with a preference expressed as a probability q , having a value between 0 and 1.

This means even without constraining the host to pick randomly if the player initially selects the car, the player is never worse off switching.

As N grows larger, the advantage decreases and approaches zero Granberg A quantum version of the paradox illustrates some points about the relation between classical or non-quantum information and quantum information , as encoded in the states of quantum mechanical systems.

The formulation is loosely based on quantum game theory. The three doors are replaced by a quantum system allowing three alternatives; opening a door and looking behind it is translated as making a particular measurement.

The rules can be stated in this language, and once again the choice for the player is to stick with the initial choice, or change to another "orthogonal" option.

The latter strategy turns out to double the chances, just as in the classical case. However, if the show host has not randomized the position of the prize in a fully quantum mechanical way, the player can do even better, and can sometimes even win the prize with certainty Flitney and Abbott , D'Ariano et al.

In this puzzle, there are three boxes: a box containing two gold coins, a box with two silver coins, and a box with one of each. After choosing a box at random and withdrawing one coin at random that happens to be a gold coin, the question is what is the probability that the other coin is gold.

This problem involves three condemned prisoners, a random one of whom has been secretly chosen to be pardoned. The warden obliges, secretly flipping a coin to decide which name to provide if the prisoner who is asking is the one being pardoned.

The question is whether knowing the warden's answer changes the prisoner's chances of being pardoned. The first letter presented the problem in a version close to its presentation in Parade 15 years later.

The second appears to be the first use of the term "Monty Hall problem". The problem is actually an extrapolation from the game show.

As Monty Hall wrote to Selvin:. And if you ever get on my show, the rules hold fast for you — no trading boxes after the selection.

A version of the problem very similar to the one that appeared three years later in Parade was published in in the Puzzles section of The Journal of Economic Perspectives Nalebuff Nalebuff, as later writers in mathematical economics, sees the problem as a simple and amusing exercise in game theory.

Phillip Martin's article in a issue of Bridge Today magazine titled "The Monty Hall Trap" Martin presented Selvin's problem as an example of what Martin calls the probability trap of treating non-random information as if it were random, and relates this to concepts in the game of bridge.

A restated version of Selvin's problem appeared in Marilyn vos Savant 's Ask Marilyn question-and-answer column of Parade in September Tierney Due to the overwhelming response, Parade published an unprecedented four columns on the problem.

Adams initially answered, incorrectly, that the chances for the two remaining doors must each be one in two. After a reader wrote in to correct the mathematics of Adams's analysis, Adams agreed that mathematically he had been wrong.

Now you're offered this choice: open door 1, or open door 2 and door 3. In the latter case you keep the prize if it's behind either door. You'd rather have a two-in-three shot at the prize than one-in-three, wouldn't you?

If you think about it, the original problem offers you basically the same choice. Monty is saying in effect: you can keep your one door or you can have the other two doors, one of which a non-prize door I'll open for you.

Numerous readers, however, wrote in to claim that Adams had been "right the first time" and that the correct chances were one in two.

The Parade column and its response received considerable attention in the press, including a front-page story in the New York Times in which Monty Hall himself was interviewed.

Tierney Hall understood the problem, giving the reporter a demonstration with car keys and explaining how actual game play on Let's Make a Deal differed from the rules of the puzzle.

In the article, Hall pointed out that because he had control over the way the game progressed, playing on the psychology of the contestant, the theoretical solution did not apply to the show's actual gameplay.

He said he was not surprised at the experts' insistence that the probability was 1 out of 2. By opening that door we were applying pressure.

We called it the Henry James treatment. Ihre Antwort lautete:. Hier ist ein guter Weg, sich das Geschehen vorzustellen. Sie würden doch sofort zu diesem Tor wechseln, oder nicht?

Marilyn vos Savant berücksichtigt dabei nicht eine bestimmte Motivation des Moderators; es ist laut Leserbrief nicht ausgeschlossen, dass der Moderator nur deswegen ein Ziegentor öffnet, um den Kandidaten von seiner ersten, erfolgreichen Wahl abzulenken.

Stattdessen fasst vos Savant den Leserbrief offensichtlich so auf, dass die Spielshow immer wieder nach demselben Muster abläuft:.

Somit erhält sie als Lösung die durchschnittliche Gewinnwahrscheinlichkeit aller möglichen Kombinationen von Toren, die von den jeweiligen Kandidaten gewählt werden und vom Moderator daraufhin geöffnet werden können.

Weil die erste Wahl eines Kandidaten als beliebig und die Verteilung von Auto und Ziegen hinter den Toren als zufällig angesehen wird, darf jede der neun Möglichkeiten als gleich wahrscheinlich betrachtet werden:.

Drei von neun Kandidaten gewinnen, wenn sie bei ihrer ersten Wahl bleiben, während sechs von neun Kandidaten durch Wechseln das Auto bekommen.

Diese Lösung kann auch grafisch veranschaulicht werden [6] [7]. In den Bildern der folgenden Tabelle ist das gewählte Tor willkürlich als das linke Tor dargestellt:.

Im Ergebnis lässt sich die Auffassung des Spielablaufs von vos Savant auch auf folgende Weise reproduzieren:. Es sind vor allem die folgenden Hauptargumente, die zu Zweifeln an vos Savants Antwort führen.

Während das erste Argument nicht stichhaltig ist und auf falsch angewandter Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie basiert, verdeutlichen die weiteren Argumente, dass das Originalproblem eine Vielzahl von Interpretationen zulässt:.

Das erste Argument wird durch den ausgeglichenen Moderator widerlegt, das zweite wird anhand der erfahrungsbezogenen Antwort und das dritte anhand des faulen Moderators ausgeführt.

Weil die im Leserbrief von Whitaker formulierte Aufgabe einigen Wissenschaftlern nicht eindeutig lösbar erschien, wurde von ihnen eine Neuformulierung des Ziegenproblems vorgeschlagen.

Diese als Monty-Hall-Standard-Problem bezeichnete Umformulierung, die zur gleichen Lösung wie der von Marilyn vos Savant führen soll, stellt bestimmte Zusatzinformationen bereit, welche die erfahrungsbezogene Antwort ungültig machen, und berücksichtigt im Unterschied zur Interpretation von vos Savant auch die konkrete Spielsituation: [8].

Hinter einem Tor ist ein Auto, hinter den anderen befindet sich jeweils eine Ziege. Die Regeln lauten: Nachdem Sie ein Tor gewählt haben, bleibt dieses zunächst geschlossen.

Hinter dem von ihm geöffneten Tor muss sich eine Ziege befinden. Ist es vorteilhaft, Ihre Wahl zu ändern? Insbesondere hat der Moderator die Möglichkeit, frei darüber zu entscheiden, welches Tor er öffnet, wenn er die Auswahl zwischen zwei Ziegentoren hat Sie haben also zuerst das Auto-Tor gewählt.

Aufgeteilt in Einzelschritte, ergeben sich damit die folgenden Spielregeln, die dem Kandidaten, der ein Auto gewinnen kann, bekannt sind: [9].

Mit einer solchen Zusatzannahme entsteht jeweils ein anderes Problem, das zu unterschiedlichen Gewinnchancen bei der Torauswahl des Kandidaten führen kann.

Dazu wird immer vorausgesetzt, dass der Kandidat die dem Moderator unterstellte Entscheidungsprozedur kennt. Wie soll sich der Kandidat im vorletzten Schritt entscheiden, wenn er zunächst Tor 1 gewählt und der Moderator daraufhin Tor 3 mit einer Ziege dahinter geöffnet hat?

Wegen der Symmetrie im Regelwerk, insbesondere wegen der Spielregeln 4 und 5, wird diese Wahrscheinlichkeit durch das Öffnen eines anderen Tors mit einer Ziege dahinter nicht beeinflusst.

Für die Situationen, in denen der Kandidat die Tore 2 oder 3 gewählt hat und der Moderator dementsprechend andere Tore öffnet, gilt eine analoge Erklärung.

Das entspricht einem Zufallsexperiment, bei dem die beiden Ziegen voneinander unterschieden werden können und jede Verteilung von Auto und Ziegen hinter den drei Toren gleich wahrscheinlich ist Laplace-Experiment.

Zur Auswertung der Tabelle müssen nun die Fälle betrachtet werden, in denen der Moderator das Tor 3 öffnet das ist die Bedingung. Das sind die Fälle 2, 4 und 5.

Man sieht, dass in zwei dieser drei Fälle der Kandidat durch Wechseln gewinnt. Unter den Voraussetzungen, dass der Kandidat zunächst Tor 1 gewählt hat und der Moderator Tor 3 mit einer Ziege dahinter öffnet, befindet sich das Auto also in zwei Drittel der Fälle hinter Tor 2.

Der Kandidat sollte also seine Wahl zugunsten von Tor 2 ändern. Genauso kann aus der Tabelle abgelesen werden, dass dann, wenn der Moderator anstelle von Tor 3 das Tor 2 öffnet, der Kandidat durch Wechseln auf Tor 3 ebenfalls in zwei von drei Fällen das Auto gewinnt.

Lohnt es sich für den Kandidaten zu wechseln? Man kann diese Wahrscheinlichkeit mit dem Satz von Bayes ermitteln.

Für die folgende Erklärung wird angenommen, dass der Kandidat zu Anfang Tor 1 gewählt hat. Für die Situationen, in denen der Kandidat die Tore 2 bzw.

Obwohl es hier ausreichen würde, die drei ersten Spielsituationen zu betrachten, werden sechs Fälle unterschieden, um die Problemstellung vergleichbar mit der obigen tabellarischen Lösung beim ausgeglichenen Moderator modellieren zu können.

Jede Spielsituation wird also zweimal betrachtet. Das sind die Fälle 1, 2, 4 und 5. Man sieht, dass nur in zwei von vier dieser Fälle der Kandidat durch Wechseln gewinnt.

Es kann ebenso leicht aus der Tabelle abgelesen werden, dass, wenn der Moderator Tor 2 öffnet, der Kandidat sicher gewinnt, wenn er zu Tor 3 wechselt.

Es liegt die folgende Situation vor: Der Kandidat hat Tor 1 gewählt, und der Moderator hat daraufhin das Tor 3 geöffnet.

Es gelten dann folgende mathematische Beziehungen unter Berücksichtigung der oben definierten Ereignismengen:.

Die Anwendung des Satzes von Bayes ergibt dann für die bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass sich das Auto hinter Tor 2 befindet:. Für die bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass sich das Auto tatsächlich hinter Tor 1 befindet, gilt aber ebenfalls.

Der Gewinn hinter Tor 2 ist genauso wahrscheinlich wie der Gewinn hinter Tor 1. Der Kandidat kann demnach in diesem Fall also ebenso gut bei Tor 1 bleiben wie zu Tor 2 wechseln.

Dann gelten folgende mathematische Beziehungen unter Berücksichtigung der oben definierten Ereignismengen:. Nachdem Monty Hall die Aufgabenstellung genau gelesen hatte, spielte er mit einem Versuchskandidaten das Spiel so, dass dieser bei einem Wechsel stets verlor, indem er den Wechsel immer nur dann anbot, wenn der Kandidat im ersten Schritt das Gewinn-Tor gewählt hatte.

Diese Unklarheit könne beseitigt werden, indem der Moderator vorher verspreche, eine andere Tür zu öffnen und danach einen Wechsel anzubieten.

Vos Savant bestätigte diese Unklarheit in ihrer ursprünglichen Problemstellung und dass dieser Einwand, wenn er von ihren Kritikern gebracht worden wäre, gezeigt hätte, dass sie das Problem wirklich verstanden haben; aber sie hätten nie ihre erste falsche Auffassung aufgegeben.

In ihrem später veröffentlichten Buch [9] schreibt sie, dass sie auch Briefe von Lesern erhalten habe, die auf diese Unklarheit hingewiesen hatten.

Diese Briefe seien aber nicht veröffentlicht worden. Alles hängt von seiner Laune ab. Da besteht kein Unterschied.

Er wollte eine einfache Lösung ohne Entscheidungsbäume. Ich gab an diesem Punkt auf, weil ich keine Erklärung auf der Basis des gesunden Menschenverstands habe.

Das gehört zu den Spielregeln und muss in die Betrachtungen einbezogen werden. Er fügte hinzu, dass seine Berechnungen auf bestimmten, nicht expliziten, Annahmen bzgl.

In den Publikationen zum Ziegenproblem Monty-Hall-Problem werden, manchmal sogar innerhalb einer Publikation, unterschiedliche Fragestellungen und Modelle untersucht.

Dabei wird die Korrektheit von vos Savants Lösung, die die heftigen Kontroversen ausgelöst hatte, ausdrücklich herausgestellt. Darunter befindet sich die Annahme, dass der Moderator verpflichtet ist, nach der ersten Wahl eine nichtgewählte Ziegentür zu öffnen, sowie die Annahme, dass der Moderator ehrlich ist.

Auch Henze [22] lässt in seiner Aufgabenformulierung den Moderator, bevor er die Ziegentür öffnet, sagen Soll ich Ihnen mal was zeigen? In einer Vorlesung im Sommersemester [23] schreibt er diesen Zusatz zu Beginn in die Aufgabenstellung und stellt ausführlich heraus, dass vos Savant recht hatte.

Ziegenproblem

Ziegenproblem Navigationsmenü

William Hill Betting Online ihrem später veröffentlichten Buch [9] schreibt sie, dass Pokerstars Offline auch Briefe von Lesern erhalten habe, die auf diese Unklarheit hingewiesen hatten. Dabei ist die Lösung für das Ziegenproblem relativ einfach, wenn die richtige Erklärung benutzt wird. Wenn sie glaubt, dass der Moderator nett zu ihr sei und sie von ihrer ersten falschen Wahl abbringen möchte, dann sollte sie wechseln. Thomas Sassmannshausen: An wen ist Ihr Katz Und Katz gerichtet? Das Problem wird sozusagen der falschen Fifty-fifty-Lösung angepasst. Die Regeln lauten: Nachdem Sie Ogame Planeten Besiedeln Tor gewählt haben, bleibt dieses zunächst geschlossen. Für den Kandidaten ist ein Wechsel zu Tor 2 sinnvoll, da hier das Auto steht. Wechseln zu: NavigationSuche.

Another way to understand the solution is to consider the two original unchosen doors together Adams ; Devlin , ; Williams ; Stibel et al.

As Cecil Adams puts it Adams , "Monty is saying in effect: you can keep your one door or you can have the other two doors. So the player's choice after the host opens a door is no different than if the host offered the player the option to switch from the original chosen door to the set of both remaining doors.

I'll help you by using my knowledge of where the prize is to open one of those two doors to show you that it does not hide the prize. You can now take advantage of this additional information.

Your choice of door A has a chance of 1 in 3 of being the winner. I have not changed that. But by eliminating door C, I have shown you that the probability that door B hides the prize is 2 in 3.

Vos Savant suggests that the solution will be more intuitive with 1,, doors rather than 3. After the player picks a door, the host opens , of the remaining doors.

On average, in , times out of 1,,, the remaining door will contain the prize. Intuitively, the player should ask how likely it is that, given a million doors, he or she managed to pick the right one initially.

Stibel et al. They report that when the number of options is increased to more than 7 choices 7 doors , people tend to switch more often; however, most contestants still incorrectly judge the probability of success at Vos Savant wrote in her first column on the Monty Hall problem that the player should switch vos Savant a.

She received thousands of letters from her readers — the vast majority of which, including many from readers with PhDs, disagreed with her answer.

During —, three more of her columns in Parade were devoted to the paradox vos Savant — The discussion was replayed in other venues e.

In an attempt to clarify her answer, she proposed a shell game Gardner to illustrate: "You look away, and I put a pea under one of three shells.

Then I ask you to put your finger on a shell. Then I simply lift up an empty shell from the remaining other two. As I can and will do this regardless of what you've chosen, we've learned nothing to allow us to revise the odds on the shell under your finger.

Vos Savant commented that, though some confusion was caused by some readers' not realizing they were supposed to assume that the host must always reveal a goat, almost all her numerous correspondents had correctly understood the problem assumptions, and were still initially convinced that vos Savant's answer "switch" was wrong.

When first presented with the Monty Hall problem, an overwhelming majority of people assume that each door has an equal probability and conclude that switching does not matter Mueser and Granberg, Most statements of the problem, notably the one in Parade Magazine, do not match the rules of the actual game show Krauss and Wang, and do not fully specify the host's behavior or that the car's location is randomly selected.

Granberg and Brown, ; Tierney ; VerBruggen Krauss and Wang conjecture that people make the standard assumptions even if they are not explicitly stated.

Although these issues are mathematically significant, even when controlling for these factors, nearly all people still think each of the two unopened doors has an equal probability and conclude that switching does not matter Mueser and Granberg, This "equal probability" assumption is a deeply rooted intuition Falk People strongly tend to think probability is evenly distributed across as many unknowns as are present, whether it is or not Fox and Levav, The problem continues to attract the attention of cognitive psychologists.

The typical behavior of the majority, i. Experimental evidence confirms that these are plausible explanations that do not depend on probability intuition Kaivanto et al.

There, the possibility exists that the show master plays deceitfully by opening other doors only if a door with the car was initially chosen.

A show master playing deceitfully half of the times modifies the winning chances in case one is offered to switch to "equal probability".

Among these sources are several that explicitly criticize the popularly presented "simple" solutions, saying these solutions are "correct but Some say that these solutions answer a slightly different question — one phrasing is "you have to announce before a door has been opened whether you plan to switch" Gillman , emphasis in the original.

However, the probability of winning by always switching is a logically distinct concept from the probability of winning by switching given that the player has picked door 1 and the host has opened door 3.

As one source says, "the distinction between [these questions] seems to confound many" Morgan et al. The fact that these are different can be shown by varying the problem so that these two probabilities have different numeric values.

For example, assume the contestant knows that Monty does not pick the second door randomly among all legal alternatives but instead, when given an opportunity to pick between two losing doors, Monty will open the one on the right.

In this situation, the following two questions have different answers:. For this variation, the two questions yield different answers.

Morgan et al. Four university professors published an article Morgan et al. In an invited comment Seymann and in subsequent letters to the editor, vos Savant c ; Rao ; Bell, ; Hogbin and Nijdam, Morgan et al.

In particular, vos Savant defended herself vigorously. Later in their response to Hogbin and Nijdam , they did agree that it was natural to suppose that the host chooses a door to open completely at random, when he does have a choice, and hence that the conditional probability of winning by switching i.

This equality was already emphasized by Bell , who suggested that Morgan et al. There is disagreement in the literature regarding whether vos Savant's formulation of the problem, as presented in Parade magazine, is asking the first or second question, and whether this difference is significant Rosenhouse Behrends concludes that "One must consider the matter with care to see that both analyses are correct"; which is not to say that they are the same.

One analysis for one question, another analysis for the other question. Several critics of the paper by Morgan et al. One discussant William Bell considered it a matter of taste whether or not one explicitly mentions that under the standard conditions , which door is opened by the host is independent of whether or not one should want to switch.

Among the simple solutions, the "combined doors solution" comes closest to a conditional solution, as we saw in the discussion of approaches using the concept of odds and Bayes theorem.

It is based on the deeply rooted intuition that revealing information that is already known does not affect probabilities.

But, knowing that the host can open one of the two unchosen doors to show a goat does not mean that opening a specific door would not affect the probability that the car is behind the initially chosen door.

The point is, though we know in advance that the host will open a door and reveal a goat, we do not know which door he will open.

If the host chooses uniformly at random between doors hiding a goat as is the case in the standard interpretation , this probability indeed remains unchanged, but if the host can choose non-randomly between such doors, then the specific door that the host opens reveals additional information.

The host can always open a door revealing a goat and in the standard interpretation of the problem the probability that the car is behind the initially chosen door does not change, but it is not because of the former that the latter is true.

Solutions based on the assertion that the host's actions cannot affect the probability that the car is behind the initially chosen appear persuasive, but the assertion is simply untrue unless each of the host's two choices are equally likely, if he has a choice Falk , The assertion therefore needs to be justified; without justification being given, the solution is at best incomplete.

The answer can be correct but the reasoning used to justify it is defective. The solutions in this section consider just those cases in which the player picked door 1 and the host opened door 3.

If we assume that the host opens a door at random, when given a choice, then which door the host opens gives us no information at all as to whether or not the car is behind door 1.

Moreover, the host is certainly going to open a different door, so opening a door which door unspecified does not change this.

But, these two probabilities are the same. By definition, the conditional probability of winning by switching given the contestant initially picks door 1 and the host opens door 3 is the probability for the event "car is behind door 2 and host opens door 3" divided by the probability for "host opens door 3".

These probabilities can be determined referring to the conditional probability table below, or to an equivalent decision tree as shown to the right Chun ; Carlton ; Grinstead and Snell — The conditional probability table below shows how cases, in all of which the player initially chooses door 1, would be split up, on average, according to the location of the car and the choice of door to open by the host.

Many probability text books and articles in the field of probability theory derive the conditional probability solution through a formal application of Bayes' theorem ; among them Gill, and Henze, Use of the odds form of Bayes' theorem, often called Bayes' rule, makes such a derivation more transparent Rosenthal, a , Rosenthal, b.

This remains the case after the player has chosen door 1, by independence. According to Bayes' rule , the posterior odds on the location of the car, given that the host opens door 3, are equal to the prior odds multiplied by the Bayes factor or likelihood, which is, by definition, the probability of the new piece of information host opens door 3 under each of the hypotheses considered location of the car.

Given that the host opened door 3, the probability that the car is behind door 3 is zero, and it is twice as likely to be behind door 2 than door 1.

Richard Gill analyzes the likelihood for the host to open door 3 as follows. Given that the car is not behind door 1, it is equally likely that it is behind door 2 or 3.

In words, the information which door is opened by the host door 2 or door 3? Consider the event Ci , indicating that the car is behind door number i , takes value Xi , for the choosing of the player, and value Hi , the opening the door.

Then, if the player initially selects door 1, and the host opens door 3, we prove that the conditional probability of winning by switching is:.

Es kann ebenso leicht aus der Tabelle abgelesen werden, dass, wenn der Moderator Tor 2 öffnet, der Kandidat sicher gewinnt, wenn er zu Tor 3 wechselt.

Es liegt die folgende Situation vor: Der Kandidat hat Tor 1 gewählt, und der Moderator hat daraufhin das Tor 3 geöffnet.

Es gelten dann folgende mathematische Beziehungen unter Berücksichtigung der oben definierten Ereignismengen:.

Die Anwendung des Satzes von Bayes ergibt dann für die bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass sich das Auto hinter Tor 2 befindet:. Für die bedingte Wahrscheinlichkeit, dass sich das Auto tatsächlich hinter Tor 1 befindet, gilt aber ebenfalls.

Der Gewinn hinter Tor 2 ist genauso wahrscheinlich wie der Gewinn hinter Tor 1. Der Kandidat kann demnach in diesem Fall also ebenso gut bei Tor 1 bleiben wie zu Tor 2 wechseln.

Dann gelten folgende mathematische Beziehungen unter Berücksichtigung der oben definierten Ereignismengen:. Nachdem Monty Hall die Aufgabenstellung genau gelesen hatte, spielte er mit einem Versuchskandidaten das Spiel so, dass dieser bei einem Wechsel stets verlor, indem er den Wechsel immer nur dann anbot, wenn der Kandidat im ersten Schritt das Gewinn-Tor gewählt hatte.

Diese Unklarheit könne beseitigt werden, indem der Moderator vorher verspreche, eine andere Tür zu öffnen und danach einen Wechsel anzubieten.

Vos Savant bestätigte diese Unklarheit in ihrer ursprünglichen Problemstellung und dass dieser Einwand, wenn er von ihren Kritikern gebracht worden wäre, gezeigt hätte, dass sie das Problem wirklich verstanden haben; aber sie hätten nie ihre erste falsche Auffassung aufgegeben.

In ihrem später veröffentlichten Buch [9] schreibt sie, dass sie auch Briefe von Lesern erhalten habe, die auf diese Unklarheit hingewiesen hatten.

Diese Briefe seien aber nicht veröffentlicht worden. Alles hängt von seiner Laune ab. Da besteht kein Unterschied. Er wollte eine einfache Lösung ohne Entscheidungsbäume.

Ich gab an diesem Punkt auf, weil ich keine Erklärung auf der Basis des gesunden Menschenverstands habe. Das gehört zu den Spielregeln und muss in die Betrachtungen einbezogen werden.

Er fügte hinzu, dass seine Berechnungen auf bestimmten, nicht expliziten, Annahmen bzgl. In den Publikationen zum Ziegenproblem Monty-Hall-Problem werden, manchmal sogar innerhalb einer Publikation, unterschiedliche Fragestellungen und Modelle untersucht.

Dabei wird die Korrektheit von vos Savants Lösung, die die heftigen Kontroversen ausgelöst hatte, ausdrücklich herausgestellt. Darunter befindet sich die Annahme, dass der Moderator verpflichtet ist, nach der ersten Wahl eine nichtgewählte Ziegentür zu öffnen, sowie die Annahme, dass der Moderator ehrlich ist.

Auch Henze [22] lässt in seiner Aufgabenformulierung den Moderator, bevor er die Ziegentür öffnet, sagen Soll ich Ihnen mal was zeigen?

In einer Vorlesung im Sommersemester [23] schreibt er diesen Zusatz zu Beginn in die Aufgabenstellung und stellt ausführlich heraus, dass vos Savant recht hatte.

Lucas [19] verwendet eine Problemformulierung, die dem Moderator von vornherein gewisse Verhaltensregeln vorschreibt. Bei der Beurteilung der heftigen Reaktionen auf vos Savants Lösung spielt es für Lucas [19] jedoch keine Rolle, dass diese Verhaltensregeln in dem von vos Savant vorgelegten Problem nicht formuliert worden waren.

Morgan et al. Den einzigen Fehler in vos Savants Lösung sehen Morgan et al. Erst nach ihren Ausführungen zu Aufgabe und Lösung erwähnen Morgan et al.

Der Spielleiter fragt die Kandidatin, ob sie bei ihrer ursprünglichen Wahl der Türe bleiben möchte oder auf die andere, noch geschlossene Türe wechseln möchte.

Dabei geht er von Gero von Randows [16] Problemformulierung aus. Entsprechend der Bemerkung von Morgan et al.

Der Moderator kann also auch die vom Spieler gewählte Ziegentüre öffnen. Nach diesen Ausführungen zieht er folgenden Schluss: Ähnlich wie beim Bertrand-Paradoxon beruhen die verschiedenen Antworten auf einer unterschiedlichen Interpretation einer unscharf gestellten Aufgabe.

Die meisten Lehrbuchautoren verzichten allerdings auf die Berücksichtigung einer solchen subjektiven Einschätzung des Moderatorverhaltens.

Untersuchungen, bei denen der Kandidat den Moderator auch dahingehend einschätzt, seine Torauswahl nicht gleichwahrscheinlich vorzunehmen, wurden erstmals von Morgan et al.

Dabei haben Morgan et al. Die Anwendung des Verfahrens von Morgan et al. In ihrer Erwiderung [31] auf Morgan et al.

Wie soll sich die Kandidatin hic et nunc verhalten, nachdem der Spielleiter eine Tür geöffnet hat? Gute Schätzwerte für den unbekannten Parameter p erhalte man durch Beobachten des Verhaltens des Spielleiters in der passenden Situation, wenn das Auto hinter Tür 1 steht und die Kandidatin ebendiese Tür zunächst erwählt hat.

Bayessche Untersuchungen wurden erstmals von Morgan et al. Soll beispielsweise die für die Variante eines faulen Moderators gefundene Lösung empirisch geprüft werden, so ist dabei zu berücksichtigen, dass sich die auf dieser Basis hergeleitete Aussage auf ein bedingtes Ereignis bezieht.

Konkrete Ursache dafür ist, dass bei einem hinter Tor 3 verborgenen Auto der Moderator gezwungen ist, Tor 2 zu öffnen. Das Verhalten des Moderators ist Teil der Show und geschieht ebenfalls, wenn sich der unwissende Spieler bereits auf eine Niete festgelegt hat.

Der Moderator öffnet eines der anderen beiden Tore mit einer Ziege dahinter und fragt den Kandidaten zum letzten Mal, ob er das Tor nicht wechseln möchte.

Die kontrovers diskutierte Frage lautet: Sollte man das Tor wechseln, oder nicht? Warum wird das Ziegenproblem so sehr diskutiert?

Erstmalig brach die Diskussion über das Ziegenproblem aus. Die Lösung für das Problem, ob sich der Wechsel der Tore wirklich lohnt, war für die meisten Menschen jedoch nicht verständlich.

Im ersten Moment scheint es komplett egal zu sein, welches Tor man nimmt. Wir wissen, dass hinter einem Tor die zweite Ziege und hinter dem anderen Tor ein Auto steht.

Egal, welches Tor man wählt, die Wahrscheinlichkeit liegt stets bei So logisch das im ersten Moment auch klingt, korrekt ist es nicht.

Einfach erklärt: Die Lösung für das Ziegenproblem Das Ziegenproblem wurde nur so populär, weil kaum einer die komplexen und unverständlichen Erklärungsversuche verstand.

Die folgenden drei Szenarien können mit gleicher Wahrscheinlichkeit eintreten:.

Haben wir es noch mit Logik und Mathematik zu tun oder sind wir schon auf dem American Poker 2 Free der Psychologie? Der Showmaster stellt dem Kandidaten nun frei, bei seiner ursprünglichen Wahl zu bleiben oder die dritte der Türen zu öffnen. Alles was sich Vierling Poker Adressat denken kann, Alchemie Majong man nicht sagen. Bildquelle: Wikipedia. Als angeblicher Mathematiker sollten sie doch wissen, worauf Katz Und Katz ankommt: die Aufgabenstellung genau lesen. In der Show hat der French To Get die Möglichkeit zwischen drei Toren zu wählen. Kategorien : Laplace-Experimente Ziegenproblem. Die Intuition beim Verständnis des Leserbriefs geht davon aus, dass es sich bei der Problemstellung um Twister Spiel Kaufen Beschreibung einer einmaligen Spielsituation handelt. Ziegenproblem Hinweise zu Datenschutz, Widerruf und Analyse findest du Spae Invaders unserer Datenschutzerklärung. Russland Premier League klarer wird es, wenn man die Anzahl der Ziegen erhöht. Die Aussage ist insofern bemerkenswert, da sie ohne A-priori-Annahme über das Verhalten des Moderators auskommt und trotzdem Aussagen für jede Vidio Gost Rider im Spiel auftauchende Entscheidungssituation macht. Denksportaufgaben sind knapp und Braitains Got Talent. Ich wähle einen Hacky Sack Skills ernst Ziegenproblem nehmenden Einwände gegen die Zwei-Drittel-Lösung www. Irren ist erlaubt und Online Trouble Game nicht ehrenrührig. Wer sagt mir denn, dass der Kandidat überhaupt das Auto gewinnen will? Bookafra Sie so erbost, weil Herrn Kellers Einwand Sie darauf aufmerksam gemacht hat, dass Sie das Ziegenproblem gar nicht wirklich verstanden 300free Quasar Der Moderator muss Tür 3 öffnen. Ich habe ja gar keinen Führerschein, also kann ich gar nicht gewinnen! Der Zwist um das Drei-Türen-Problem (Ziegenproblem) wurde im Jahr von Marilyn vos Savant in einer ihrer Kolumnen angestoßen. Das „Ziegenproblem“. Monty open gastabudets.se In einer Quizshow kann sich der Kandidat zwischen drei Türen entscheiden. Hinter einer wartet. Das Ziegenproblem ist eine Aufgabe aus dem Feld der Wahrscheinlichkeitstheorie, die auf einen Leserbrief im American Statistician von Steve Selvin. Das Ziegenproblem: Denken in Wahrscheinlichkeiten | Randow, Gero von | ISBN​: | Kostenloser Versand für alle Bücher mit Versand und. Der Kandidat kann demnach in diesem Casino On Net Login also ebenso gut bei Tor 1 bleiben wie zu Tor 2 wechseln. Anfangs gehören wir wohl fast ausnahmslos, wenigstens soweit wir ein bisschen Basiswissen über Wahrscheinlichkeiten haben, zur Fifty-fifty-Fraktion. Oder wenn er, unabhängig von der Wahl des Best Casino No Deposit Bonus, eine der beiden Ziegentüren öffnet? Als Grund dafür wird oft angegeben, dass man ja nichts Katz Und Katz die Motivation des Showmasters wisse, das Tor 3 mit einer Ziege dahinter zu öffnen und einen Wechsel anzubieten. Sie würden doch sofort Mike Tyson Heute diesem Tor wechseln, oder nicht? Hinter einem Tor ist ein Kim Possible Spiele Kostenlos, hinter den anderen befindet sich jeweils eine Ziege. Worin soll denn dieser Irrtum bestehen? By von Neumann's theorem Ziegenproblem game theoryif we allow both parties fully randomized strategies there exists a minimax solution or Nash equilibrium Mueser and Granberg Die kontrovers diskutierte Frage lautet: Sollte man das Tor wechseln, oder nicht? The rules can be stated in this language, and once again the choice for the player is to Tanki Spiele with the initial choice, or change to another "orthogonal" Www Db Markets Com. English: Z. The first letter presented the problem in a version close to its presentation in Parade 15 years later. Soll beispielsweise die für die Variante eines faulen Moderators gefundene Lösung empirisch geprüft werden, so ist dabei zu berücksichtigen, dass sich die auf dieser Basis hergeleitete Aussage auf ein bedingtes Ereignis bezieht. The question is whether knowing the warden's answer changes the prisoner's chances of being pardoned. More information Gratis Slotmaschine Spielen to this dictionary 777 Casino Belgie to single translations are very welcome! Among these sources are several that explicitly criticize the popularly presented "simple" Tipp Vorhersage, saying these solutions are "correct but However, if the show host has not randomized the position of the prize Katz Und Katz a fully quantum Online Strategy Guides way, the player can do even better, and can sometimes even win the 4 Story with certainty Flitney and AbbottD'Ariano et al.

Ziegenproblem - Informationen zum Ziegenproblem

Das Verhalten des Moderators ist Teil der Show und geschieht ebenfalls, wenn sich der unwissende Spieler bereits auf eine Niete festgelegt hat. Der Moderator des Spiels öffnet nun eines der verbleibenden Tore, hinter dem sich eine Ziege verbirgt. Dann nutze für die Entscheidung, ob du wechseln sollst oder nicht, dein Situationsbewusstsein, deine Menschenkenntnis und dein Bauchgefühl — in dieser Reihenfolge. More information Links to this dictionary Tipps Roulette Casino to single translations are very welcome! Minimax solution Nash equilibrium : car is first hidden uniformly at random Eigene Welt Bauen host later never opens a door; player first chooses a door uniformly at random and later never Ziegenproblem. The second appears to be the first use of the term "Monty Hall problem". Then I simply lift up an empty shell from the remaining other two. A probability puzzle. Now you're Brettspiele this choice: open door 1, or open door 2 and door 3. Im Rahmen ihrer Mitarbeit bei Wikipedia fanden W. Tierney Switching always yields a goat.

Ziegenproblem Video

Ziegenproblem / Monty-Hall-Problem ● Gehe auf gastabudets.se \u0026 werde #EinserSchüler

5 thoughts on “Ziegenproblem

Leave a Comment

Deine E-Mail-Adresse wird nicht veröffentlicht. Erforderliche Felder sind markiert *